Automatic BAKE Fail

Thanks to Daniel for:

14 Responses to “Automatic BAKE Fail”


  1. 1 Anna June 29, 2008 at 3:44 am

    Actually, Severin is a Swedish/Scandinavian brand, and “back” means “bake” in Swedish. No fail there. The slogan is in Swedish. Automatic happens to be the same in both languages.

  2. 2 Swigo June 29, 2008 at 4:08 am

    I´m sorry, but you´re completely wrong. The word “back” doesn´t mean “bake” in Swedish, the correct word for “bake” would be “baka”.

    If the slogan would have been in Swedish it would have read “Automatisk bakmaskin” or just “Bakmaskin”.

  3. 3 Anna June 29, 2008 at 4:34 am

    It meant that the machine has an automatic pop up tray at the end of the baking cycle. In that case it’s not even an English fail, but a Swedish/Swenglish fail.

  4. 4 Cat June 29, 2008 at 11:20 am

    Wow…stop trying so hard to make this not a fail…

  5. 5 L June 29, 2008 at 11:51 am

    If it’s Swedish, that’s one cheap breadmaker: 38 Swedish kronor is like 6 bucks! Price fail? (Even if that’s Euros, it’s still a cheap breadmaker… which probably explains the box.)

  6. 6 no shid! June 29, 2008 at 12:11 pm

    That’s dutch!

  7. 7 F. June 29, 2008 at 12:36 pm

    The price tag says “pöytägrilli” which is Finnish. (They use euros, €38 would be reasonable price for this.)

    The Severin Elektrogeräte GmbH is an international household appliances company from Sundern, Germany. “Back” simply means “to bake” in German. Well strictly speaking it’s “backen”, “back” is some kind of stand-alone prefix word here. “Back” is to “backen” what “BAK-” would be to “BAKing” in English. Think “BAK-O-MATIC”.

    I’m certain this box is saying exactly what a highly-paid professional marketing department wanted it to say. It should say “automatik-back” in proper German, but that doesn’t sound cool enough. It’s perfectly ‘normal’ for German companies to mix English words into their product descriptions in an attempt to look more impressive.

    Sorry, this really isn’t failed English. Marketing-speak doesn’t even TRY to pass off as coherent language. It’s more of “failed German”, if anything.

  8. 8 kalafudra June 30, 2008 at 4:01 am

    And how it is failed German!

    In proper Germand it would have been “Automatische Backmaschine” or “Automatisches Backgerät”. Automatic Back? Not even a really good marketing campaign could pull that off.

  9. 9 Adhara June 30, 2008 at 8:41 am

    I thought “bäcken” had an umlaut…? Eh, it’s been a few years since I took German.

    If “baka” is proper Swedish for “bake”, though, that makes me laugh. “Baka” is Japanese for “idiot” and is a commonly-used mild insult. I wouldn’t call that a fail, though, since it’s not an intentional or unintentional slip-up.

  10. 10 F. June 30, 2008 at 2:33 pm

    @Adhara: you’re probably not thinking of the verb backen but of Bäcker (baker) or Bäckerei (bakery)

    Oh, let me clarify that by ‘proper’ I meant by the, um, ‘standards’ of marketing. That is, just German enough so that you could at least recognize which language it’s in.

    “Backautomat”. It could be as simple as that. But how would THAT look on a box?

  11. 11 daddy00 July 2, 2008 at 6:30 am

    Good job for taking the fun out of that one, everybody.

  12. 12 your mum September 8, 2008 at 12:02 pm

    Come on!
    It’s no fun when it’s based on your ignorance.
    I would prefer “to know” than “to laugh” every time…

  13. 13 Anonymous October 26, 2008 at 3:52 pm

    Maybe it’s supposed to sever your back automatically?

  14. 14 Bill Awesome March 5, 2010 at 8:01 am

    all you guy’s just need to shut up


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